David Chapter 3: Betrayal!

Have you ever been betrayed?

What would you do if you helped someone, like literally saved someone and that very person sells you out? What would you do? David was confronted with such a scenario. Here’s the story…

David had been declared enemy of state. His troubles began right after he killed Goliath. He had captured the imagination of the nation and King Saul had become jealous. In fact he became afraid. The whole thing was compounded by the fact Saul had issues with God. God had stopped backing him. He saw David as a threat to his lineage and he devoted the entire state apparatus to eliminating him. Saul had somehow convinced himself David was after his life. David had to flee into exile. He first fled south to the mountains of Judah. Then he fled to Gath. That’s Philistine territory by the way. He sought refuge under King Achish. That was an irony given the fact David killed Goliath the Philistine champion. The aides of Achish would have none of it and the conversation turned against David. He feigned instant insanity. It was such a convincing act King Achish wondered why they brought him a madman. There were enough madmen in Gath. David then escaped to the cave of Adullam. It was at Adullam that he built an army – a ragtag army. His brothers, cousins and other relatives fled to him. Some of these brothers and relatives were originally in Saul’s army but they deserted. They were joined by dissidents and all those who had ideological issues with Saul, as well as those in economic distress. The army numbered 400 at this stage. It would later grow to 600. But squashed between the making of this army and the story we’re pursuing was a major incident.

Saul in his paranoia had accused his own kinsmen of betraying him. He turned ethnic. In steps a terrible fellow named Doeg. He accused an innocent pastor at Nob of arming David to murder Saul. When David was fleeing from Saul the pastor had given David a loaf of bread and handed over Goliath’s sword at David’s request. David told him he was on errand for the king and left in a hurry. Since David was Saul’s son-in-law the pastor suspected nothing. Based on Doeg’s testimonial, Saul issued an executive order for the extermination of all the pastors at Nob. Nob was a priest city. With great relish, Doeg murdered 85 priests. He sacked the city, killed the families of the priests – men, women, children and babies. He decimated cattle, donkeys, goats and sheep. It was an inspired murderous spree. The priests were in their robes. Only one fellow escaped. His name is Abiathar. He ran to David.

Now, word had come to David the Philistines were raiding Keilah, a town in Judah. The Philistines looted the grain; the people were helpless. Saul who was supposed to protect them was preoccupied with hunting David. David asked God: “Should I go after these Philistines and teach them a lesson?” God said yes, go and save the people of Keilah. But his men were afraid so David asked for confirmation. “Head for Keilah” God repeated. And so David went to Keilah, beat up the Philistines and saved the people. When Saul heard David was in Keilah he mobilised and went after him. Note he never mobilised to go and save the people of Keilah when the Philistines attacked. Now Keilah was a walled city with locked gates. This delighted Saul no end. David was trapped he said. But David got wind Saul was coming so he consulted his mentor, God on what to do. He was a bit worried about the people of Keilah and so specifically asked God if the city fathers would hand him over to Saul. God told him in no uncertain terms they would betray him. “They’ll turn you over” God said. David departed fast! When you think of it, the whole thing is rather sad. How do you betray the man who saved you, saved your families? The Keilahites were ready to betray their saviour. David had risked his life for ingrates.

Betrayal is a breaking of unspoken trust, a disappointment of unspoken expectations. This puts the whole Judas thing into perspective. How did Jesus feel? Think of your friend doing that to you. Think of your bosom friend selling you out. And for what? $185? That’s 30 pieces of silver in today’s money. Was Judas jealous of Jesus? We’ll never know. But jealousy can inspire betrayal. Betrayal is a tool of elimination.

Imagine the sense of impotence Jesus had. He saw Judas coming from ten miles off but could do nothing about it. He couldn’t even protect himself. He had to go to the cross. In his humanity perhaps he would have loved to teach Judas a lesson or two but he could not. He had to be on that cross. Jesus put aside his personal feelings and faced the program. “Thy will be done.” He was pained as a man but he rationalised the betrayal as God.

We don’t always see betrayal coming, however. Betrayal many times sneaks up on you. That’s part of the characteristics of betrayal. Its why you’re shocked when it happens!

Betrayal has a way of blindsiding us. This can create rage in us and if we’re not careful we will devote our entire life to retaliation, seeking to pay back our enemy. The problem with that is that we become our enemy. The wrath of man cannot bring about the righteousness God desires. “Human anger is never a legitimate tool to promote God’s righteousness.” James 1:20 TPT. So what do you do about betrayal? Nothing! Learn from David.

The Doeg thing really hit David. And as usual he vented it out in his blog. Look at what he wrote: “You scheme catastrophe… You love evil more than good, you call black white… God will tear you from limb to limb, sweep you up and throw you out, pull you by the roots from the land of life.” Psalm 52:1-5 MSG. The fact Doeg had money only made David more impotent. It’s why he called him “Big Man”. “Big Man trusted in big money, made his living from catastrophe.” Psalm 52:6-7 MSG.

When faced with issues like this just hand it over to God. Note that despite expressing those feelings David didn’t do a thing. He handed it over to God: “I trust in the generous mercy of God then and now…And I’ll stay right here your good name, my hope.” Psalm 52:8-9 MSG. Do the same. Look at David’s conclusion on the matter: “God will repay each one according to what they have done.” Psalm 62:12.

If you’ll like to receive Jesus into your life please pray this prayer: “Father I acknowledge that I am a sinner, that Jesus died for me, that you raised him from the dead. Father please forgive me. I accept Jesus today as my Lord and my Saviour. Amen.”

© Leke Alder | talk2me@lekealder.com.

What would you do if you helped someone, like literally saved someone and that very person sells you out? Click To Tweet David had been declared enemy of state. His troubles began right after he killed Goliath. He had captured the imagination of the nation and King Saul had become jealous. Click To Tweet Saul who was supposed to protect them was preoccupied with hunting David. Click To Tweet David had risked his life for ingrates. Click To Tweet Betrayal is a breaking of unspoken trust, a disappointment of unspoken expectations. Click To Tweet Think of your bosom friend selling you out. And for what? $185? That’s 30 pieces of silver in today’s money. Click To Tweet Jealousy can inspire betrayal. Click To Tweet Betrayal is a tool of elimination. Click To Tweet Jesus put aside his personal feelings and faced the program. “Thy will be done.” He was pained as a man but he rationalised the betrayal as God. Click To Tweet Betrayal has a way of blindsiding us. This can create rage in us and if we’re not careful we will devote our entire life to retaliation, seeking to pay back our enemy. Click To Tweet The wrath of man cannot bring about the righteousness God desires. “Human anger is never a legitimate tool to promote God’s righteousness.” James 1:20 TPT. Click To Tweet So what do you do about betrayal? Nothing! Learn from David. Click To Tweet