David Chapter 15: Six Degrees of Mercy

David somehow remains the architype of the 21st century saint. In the Bible a saint is not a dead guy. Every Christian is a saint, including those who are in heaven. To use an evocative phraseology, they’re the saints triumphant. They’ve overcome death. The word is derived from the Greek verb, “hagiazo.” It basically means “to set apart.” Can also mean “sanctify” or “make holy.” It’s why Paul constantly referred to Christians as saints in his letters. Ephesians 1:1. And you don’t need to be canonized to be a saint. There’s no committee on sainthood. You’re automatically a saint if you’re a Christian. You’re set apart unto God, made holy. To sound very spiritual, you’re sanctified.

David anticipated the 21st century. The man was blogging before the word was even invented. And he foresaw Twitter, spoke about the idea. In one of his blogs he wrote, “I’m like a buzzard in the desert, a crow perched on the rubble. Insomniac, I twitter away…” Psalm 102:7 MSG.

We can see ourselves in David. He makes us comfortable being our struggling and imperfect selves. He shows us we can still hunger after God despite our sinfulnesses; that it’s all about relationship rather than religious rites. Of all the humans in the Bible he was probably the one who had the most emotional relationship with God. The guy is authentic. Very believable. And he had no airs. Just basic. Apparently, God likes such people – guys who are honest about their everyday struggles to please God, guys who live inside out with God. One must be sincere and honest with God. David changed our perception of God. Through David’s blog we see a God who’s very personal. No one had ever related to God that way. The relationship was intense and emotional. God couldn’t get rid of him, couldn’t fight him for long. They always made up. “What profit is there in my death, if I go down to the grave? Will the dust praise you? Will it declare your faithfulness?” David once asked God.

The thing about David though is that he attributed everything about his life to the grace and mercy of God. He wasn’t trying to be religious he was just stating facts. We go to church and mouth platitudes and follow templates during worship. Not David. He was talking reality. In one of his blogs he made reference to six mercies. Here’s the list of mercies: forgiveness of sins, healing of diseases, redemption from hell – as in troubles, the love of God, God’s niceness, renewal of youth. This is how he put it: “O my soul, bless God, don’t forget a single blessing! He forgives your sins – every one. He heals your diseases – every one. He redeems you from hell – saves your life! He crowns you with love and mercy – a paradise crown. He wraps you in goodness – beauty eternal! He renews your youth – you’re always young in his presence.” Psalm 103: 2-5. And so we see a God who’s very kind, holds no grudges; a God who wants us to live in health; saves us from literal and metaphorical hell; is so nice he overwhelms us with kindness; is so much interested in our youth and vigor he administers youth serum and anti-aging formula, and then loads us with good stuff and presents. These things are not real to us because of our religious mindset. David wasn’t trying to write a sermon, he was talking about his day to day experience. As far as David was concerned birthday gifts were presents from a God “who fills my life with good things.” He wasn’t talking abstract.

When next you receive a Christmas gift, or Valentine day gift or birthday gift you’re experiencing a God who fills your life with good things. David is talking real stuff – that pair of shoes, that shirt, that car, that make up kit, that belt, that bag… That’s God filling your life with good things. David says you should praise God for those presents. “Oh you look so young! You don’t look your age.” How many times have you heard that? Well, David says it’s God who made it possible. “My youth is renewed like the eagle’s.” Psalm 103:5. You went through a particularly rough patch in your life. You almost died, either from health challenges, or your business difficulties were so great you barely survived… Or your friends stabbed you so bad it’s a miracle you’re alive. Or you spiraled into massive depression but miraculously came out of it… David says that’s God redeeming you from hell. And he should know. His son plotted against him, his friends stabbed him, he was declared an enemy of state and hounded to hell. We can’t appreciate these scriptures because we can’t connect them with our day to day experiences. And yet God is real in our circumstances, working behind the scene, making coincidences happen, promoting goodwill towards us, doing PR for us.

God deserves our praise and our worship. Worship him with your life.

If you’ll like to give your life to Christ please pray this prayer: “Father I acknowledge that I am a sinner, that Jesus died for me, that you raised him from the dead. Father please forgive me. I accept Jesus today as my Lord and my Saviour. Amen.”

© Leke Alder | talk2me@lekealder.com.

In the Bible a saint is not a dead guy. Every Christian is a saint, including those who are in heaven. #Illuminare Click To Tweet You don’t need to be canonized to be a saint. There’s no committee on sainthood. You’re automatically a saint if you’re a Christian. #Illuminare Click To Tweet We can see ourselves in David. He makes us comfortable being our struggling and imperfect selves. He shows us we can still hunger after God despite our sinfulnesses; that it’s all about relationship rather than religious rites.… Click To Tweet One must be sincere and honest with God. #Illuminare Click To Tweet God is real in our circumstances, working behind the scene, making coincidences happen, promoting goodwill towards us, doing PR for us. #Illuminare Click To Tweet God deserves our praise and our worship. Worship him with your life. #Illuminare Click To Tweet